Ashley Hinson

i
Hinson Hosts Town Hall in Tama
hinson.house.gov, Press ReleaseAugust 31, 2021

Washington, D.C. – Representative Ashley Hinson (IA-01) held a town hall in Tama County today as she continues to follow through on her commitment to being transparent and accessible to her constituents. Questions from constituents were not pre-screened or filtered.

“Thank you to everyone who joined my town hall in Tama County today. We had a great discussion on a wide range of issues including the border crisis, runaway government spending, and concerns about the Administration’s plan to eliminate stepped-up basis. 

“The feedback I received today will be invaluable when I head back to Washington soon—I’ll keep bringing the kitchen table issues to Congress and proposing common sense solutions to the real challenges Iowans are facing.” 
Congresswoman Ashley Hinson

Current Position: US Representative for IA 1st District since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 2017 – 2021

Featured Quote: 
Here’s the deal: President Trump’s policies at the border worked. We need to finish construction of the border wall. We need to end catch and release. President Biden can do these two things today. He needs to now. #IA01 #IApolitics

Featured Video: 
Infrastructure spending needs to have bipartisan support: Rep. Ashley Hinson

Mariannette Miller-Meeks

i
Miller-Meeks Announces Federal Grants for Second District Fire Departments
millermeeks.house.gov, Press ReleaseSeptember 2, 2021

OTTUMWA, I.A.—Today, September 2nd, 2021, Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks (IA-02) announced that two federal grants have been awarded to fire departments in Iowa’s Second District.

The fire departments for the cities of Burlington and Osceola were recently awarded grants from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) Grant program. This program is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in cooperation with the U.S. Fire Administration.

Through the grants, the City of Burlington will receive $91,883.64, and the City of Osceola will receive $180,223.33 to support fire prevention and safety.

“I am thrilled to see FEMA award grants to two deserving Iowa fire departments. These grants will go a long way to supporting the fire departments in Burlington and Osceola,” said Miller-Meeks. “I applaud DHS and FEMA for working to assist our local fire companies. As a member of the Homeland Security Committee, with jurisdiction over DHS and FEMA, I look forward to continuing to work to support Iowans wherever I can.”

Current Position: US Representative for IA 2nd Distridt since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Senator from 2019 – 2021; Director of the Iowa Department of Public Health from 2011 – 2014

Featured Quote: 
No one is more worthy of experiencing open access to the incredible places that the men and women have fought to keep us free and their families who have also made the ultimate sacrifice along with them. #VIPAct

Featured Video: 
Sen. Mariannette Miller-Meeks

Randy Feenstra

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Feenstra Announces 2021 Military Academy Selection Board
feenstra.gov.house, Press ReleaseSeptember 2, 2021

HULL, Iowa — Today, Rep. Randy Feenstra (IA-04) announced the eight members who will serve on the 2021 Military Academy Selection Board for the 4th District. Four members will serve on the board for two years, while the other four will serve for one year to create an annual four-person rotation.

“I am pleased to announce the eight members who will serve on our inaugural Military Academy Selection Board,” said Rep. Feenstra. “I appreciate their willingness to volunteer their time, charged with the unique and important task of selecting candidates to recommend for one of four U.S. service academies. This process is an outstanding opportunity for Iowans seeking to serve our country and wanting to receive a quality education. I strongly encourage interested Iowans to apply for a nomination through my office.”

Current Position: US Representative for IA 4th District since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Senator from 2009 – 2021; Treasurer of Sioux County from 2006 – 2008

Featured Quote: 
Iowans #FiredFinkenauer b/c she helped Pelosi pass her radical agenda at every turn – higher taxes & taxpayer funded abortions. We stopped her once and we will do it again. Nobody works harder than @ChuckGrassley. All 99 counties every year, working for Iowa farmers & families.

Featured Video: 
Meet the Lawmaker: Rep. Randy Feenstra, R-Iowa

Ashley HinsonAshley Hinson

Current Position: US Representative for IA 1st District since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 2017 – 2021

Featured Quote: 
Here’s the deal: President Trump’s policies at the border worked. We need to finish construction of the border wall. We need to end catch and release. President Biden can do these two things today. He needs to now. #IA01 #IApolitics

Featured Video: 
Infrastructure spending needs to have bipartisan support: Rep. Ashley Hinson

i
Hinson Hosts Town Hall in Tama
hinson.house.gov, Press ReleaseAugust 31, 2021

Washington, D.C. – Representative Ashley Hinson (IA-01) held a town hall in Tama County today as she continues to follow through on her commitment to being transparent and accessible to her constituents. Questions from constituents were not pre-screened or filtered.

“Thank you to everyone who joined my town hall in Tama County today. We had a great discussion on a wide range of issues including the border crisis, runaway government spending, and concerns about the Administration’s plan to eliminate stepped-up basis. 

“The feedback I received today will be invaluable when I head back to Washington soon—I’ll keep bringing the kitchen table issues to Congress and proposing common sense solutions to the real challenges Iowans are facing.” 
Congresswoman Ashley Hinson

News

i
Hinson Hosts Town Hall in Tama
hinson.house.gov, Press ReleaseAugust 31, 2021

Washington, D.C. – Representative Ashley Hinson (IA-01) held a town hall in Tama County today as she continues to follow through on her commitment to being transparent and accessible to her constituents. Questions from constituents were not pre-screened or filtered.

“Thank you to everyone who joined my town hall in Tama County today. We had a great discussion on a wide range of issues including the border crisis, runaway government spending, and concerns about the Administration’s plan to eliminate stepped-up basis. 

“The feedback I received today will be invaluable when I head back to Washington soon—I’ll keep bringing the kitchen table issues to Congress and proposing common sense solutions to the real challenges Iowans are facing.” 
Congresswoman Ashley Hinson

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for IA 1st District since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 2017 – 2021

Featured Quote: 
Here’s the deal: President Trump’s policies at the border worked. We need to finish construction of the border wall. We need to end catch and release. President Biden can do these two things today. He needs to now. #IA01 #IApolitics

Featured Video: 
Infrastructure spending needs to have bipartisan support: Rep. Ashley Hinson

About

Ashley Hinson 1

Source: Government page

A native Iowan, Ashley has served her home state in various capacities over the years.

She grew up in Des Moines, and after receiving her B.A. in Broadcast Journalism from the University of Southern California, she moved to the Cedar Rapids area to work and raise a family. She currently lives in Marion with her husband, Matt, who is a small business owner and their two sons, Max and Jax.

For nearly a decade, Ashley was an on-air reporter for KCRG-TV in Cedar Rapids. She traveled throughout the state to cover issues that mattered to Iowans and tell their stories on air. During her time as a reporter she won multiple accolades, including two Midwest regional Emmy awards and recognition as both a RTDNA Health Reporting Fellow and a Waypoint Tribute to Women Honoree.

Her reporting career inspired her to serve Iowans in a different way– by running for a seat in the Iowa State House. In 2017, she became the first woman to represent Iowa’s 67th district, which includes Hiawatha, Robins, Cedar Rapids and Marion. During her tenure, she was a fierce advocate for taxpayers, helping to cut taxes and reign in irresponsible spending. She also championed workforce development and rural broadband initiatives and helped make childcare more accessible for working parents across Iowa.

Ashley is deeply involved in her community. She belongs to Antioch Christian Church, and is a member of March of Dimes, Young Parents Network and the National Council on Youth Leadership.

Ashley now represents Iowa’s First District in Congress and fights each day for Iowa families, businesses, and farmers.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

Offices

1429 Longworth House Office Building

Washington, DC  20515

Phone: (202) 225-2911
118 Third Avenue SE
Suite 206

Cedar Rapids, IA  52401

Phone: (319) 364-2288
521A Lafayette Street

Waterloo, IA   50703

Phone: (319) 266-6925
1050 Main St.

Dubuque, IA  52001

Phone: (563) 557-7789

 

Web

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Twitter

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Wikipedia Entry

Ashley Elizabeth Hinson (née Arenholz; born June 27, 1983)[1] is an American politician and journalist serving as the U.S. Representative for Iowa’s 1st congressional district since 2021. A member of the Republican Party, her district comprises much of the northeast quadrant of the state, including Cedar Rapids, Waterloo, Cedar Falls and Dubuque.

Hinson was the Iowa State Representative for the 67th district from 2017 to 2021, the first woman to represent the district.[2] She won a seat in the United States House of Representatives in the 2020 election, narrowly defeating incumbent Democrat Abby Finkenauer. Hinson, along with Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks, are the first Republican women to represent Iowa in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Early life, education and career

A native of Des Moines, Iowa, Hinson is a graduate of Valley High School in West Des Moines and the University of Southern California, where she studied broadcast journalism.[3] She is an alumna of the Pi Beta Phi sorority.[4] Hinson began her career as an anchor for KCRG-TV.[5]

Iowa House of Representatives

Elections

In 2016, Hinson decided to run for Iowa’s 67th House District, based in Linn County, Iowa. She defeated Democrat Mark Seidl 62.5%-37.5%.[6]

This Cedar Rapids suburban district is very competitive politically. 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton won this district over Donald Trump by two percentage points.[7]

In 2018, Hinson faced a competitive race against teacher Eric Gjerde. She defeated him, 52%–48%.[8][9]

Committee assignments

Hinson served on several committees in the Iowa House – the Judiciary committee; the Public Safety committee; and the Transportation committee, where she was chair. She also served on the Transportation, Infrastructure, and Capitals Appropriations Subcommittee.

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

On May 13, 2019, Hinson filed paperwork to run against Democratic incumbent Abby Finkenauer in Iowa’s 1st congressional district.[7]

The district, which encompasses 20 counties in northeastern Iowa, was flipped in the 2018 election.[10] Hinson was announced as a “contender” by the National Republican Congressional Committee. She was endorsed by Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds and Lieutenant Governor Adam Gregg.[11] On June 2, 2020, Hinson won the Republican primary.[12]

Hinson focused her campaign on cutting taxes and building infrastructure.[2] In July 2020, The New York Times reported on several instances of Hinson’s campaign website plagiarizing portions of articles from media outlets. Hinson said she “was unaware of the plagiarism when I reviewed drafts presented to me by staff. As a journalist I take this extremely seriously and am deeply sorry for the mistake. The staff responsible will be held accountable.”[13][14]

Hinson beat incumbent Democrat Abby Finkenauer in the November general election.[15]

Tenure

Hinson, along with all other Senate and House Republicans, voted against the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.[16]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Electoral history

ElectionPolitical resultCandidatePartyVotes%
Iowa House of Representatives General Election, 2018 [21]
District 67
Turnout: 16,537
Republican holdAshley HinsonRepublican8,59352.0%
Eric Gjerde Democratic7,93248.0%
Write-in votes120.1%
Iowa House of Representatives General Election, 2016 [22]
District 67
Turnout: 17,997
Republican holdAshley HinsonRepublican11,24862.50%
Mark Seidl Democratic6,74937.50%
2020 Election for U.S. Representative of Iowa’s 1st Congressional District
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Ashley Hinson 212,088 51.2
DemocraticAbby Finkenauer (incumbent)201,34748.7
Write-in4340.1

Personal life

On November 12, 2020, Hinson tested positive for COVID-19.[23]

See also

References

  1. ^ “Representative Ashley Hinson”. Retrieved December 30, 2020.
  2. ^ a b Stabile, Angelica (November 9, 2020). “13 GOP women join the House, dominating congressional elections, making history”. FOX News. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  3. ^ “Alumni: Ashley Hinson”. Annenberg TV News. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  4. ^ “Representative Ashley Elizabeth Hinson (Ashley) (R-Iowa, 1st) – Biography from LegiStorm”. www.legistorm.com. Retrieved March 17, 2021.
  5. ^ Carros, Adam (January 18, 2019). “Rep. Hinson considering run for Congress”. KCRG-TV9. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  6. ^ https://sos.iowa.gov/elections/pdf/2016/general/canvsummary.pdf
  7. ^ a b Rynard, Pat. “Ashley Hinson Files For 1st District Run Against Abby Finkenauer”. Iowa Starting Line. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  8. ^ “Ashley Hinson”. Ballotpedia. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  9. ^ “Gjerde and Hinson attack one another’s record in TV ads”. kcrg.com. Retrieved August 26, 2020.
  10. ^ “Ashley Hinson, Abby Finkenauer raise $3 million in 2019 for Iowa’s 1st District race”. The Gazette. January 8, 2020. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  11. ^ “Hinson Turns in More Than Four Times the Required Signatures to be on the Ballot”. February 25, 2020. Retrieved August 26, 2020.
  12. ^ KCRG News Staff. “Hinson wins 1st District Republican nomination, will face Finkenauer”. kcrg.com. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  13. ^ “Top Democrats Send Letter on Possible Foreign Meddling in November Election”. The New York Times. July 20, 2020. Retrieved April 23, 2021.
  14. ^ I violated your trust’: Ashley Hinson apologizes for plagiarism”. KCCI. July 26, 2020. Retrieved April 23, 2021.
  15. ^ Gruber-Miller, Stephen (November 2, 2020). “Republican Ashley Hinson unseats U.S. Rep. Abby Finkenauer in Iowa’s 1st District”. Des Moines Register. Retrieved April 23, 2021.
  16. ^ Carl Hulse (March 6, 2021). “After Stimulus Victory in Senate, Reality Sinks in: Bipartisanship Is Dead”. New York Times.
  17. ^ “Hinson Tapped to Serve on House Appropriations Committee | Representative Ashley Hinson”. hinson.house.gov. Retrieved February 2, 2021.
  18. ^ “Hinson Named To Key Appropriations Subcommittees | Representative Ashley Hinson”. hinson.house.gov. Retrieved February 2, 2021.
  19. ^ a b “Hinson Selected to Serve on House Budget Committee | Representative Ashley Hinson”. hinson.house.gov. Retrieved February 2, 2021.
  20. ^ “Membership”. Republican Study Committee. December 6, 2017. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  21. ^ “Official Results”. Iowa Secretary of State. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  22. ^ “2016 General Election Canvass Summary” (PDF). Iowa Secretary of State. p. 131. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  23. ^ “Congresswoman-elect Ashley Hinson tests positive for COVID-19, will isolate”. KCCI. November 12, 2020. Retrieved June 7, 2021.

External links

Iowa House of Representatives
Preceded by
Kraig Paulsen
Member of the Iowa House of Representatives
from the 67th district

2017–2021
Succeeded by
Eric Gjerde
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Abby Finkenauer
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Iowa’s 1st congressional district

2021–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Yvette Herrell
United States representatives by seniority
396th
Succeeded by
Ronny Jackson


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

 

X
Mariannette Miller-MeeksMariannette Miller-Meeks

Current Position: US Representative for IA 2nd Distridt since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Senator from 2019 – 2021; Director of the Iowa Department of Public Health from 2011 – 2014

Featured Quote: 
No one is more worthy of experiencing open access to the incredible places that the men and women have fought to keep us free and their families who have also made the ultimate sacrifice along with them. #VIPAct

Featured Video: 
Sen. Mariannette Miller-Meeks

i
Miller-Meeks Announces Federal Grants for Second District Fire Departments
millermeeks.house.gov, Press ReleaseSeptember 2, 2021

OTTUMWA, I.A.—Today, September 2nd, 2021, Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks (IA-02) announced that two federal grants have been awarded to fire departments in Iowa’s Second District.

The fire departments for the cities of Burlington and Osceola were recently awarded grants from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) Grant program. This program is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in cooperation with the U.S. Fire Administration.

Through the grants, the City of Burlington will receive $91,883.64, and the City of Osceola will receive $180,223.33 to support fire prevention and safety.

“I am thrilled to see FEMA award grants to two deserving Iowa fire departments. These grants will go a long way to supporting the fire departments in Burlington and Osceola,” said Miller-Meeks. “I applaud DHS and FEMA for working to assist our local fire companies. As a member of the Homeland Security Committee, with jurisdiction over DHS and FEMA, I look forward to continuing to work to support Iowans wherever I can.”

News

i
Miller-Meeks Announces Federal Grants for Second District Fire Departments
millermeeks.house.gov, Press ReleaseSeptember 2, 2021

OTTUMWA, I.A.—Today, September 2nd, 2021, Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks (IA-02) announced that two federal grants have been awarded to fire departments in Iowa’s Second District.

The fire departments for the cities of Burlington and Osceola were recently awarded grants from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Fire Prevention and Safety (FP&S) Grant program. This program is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in cooperation with the U.S. Fire Administration.

Through the grants, the City of Burlington will receive $91,883.64, and the City of Osceola will receive $180,223.33 to support fire prevention and safety.

“I am thrilled to see FEMA award grants to two deserving Iowa fire departments. These grants will go a long way to supporting the fire departments in Burlington and Osceola,” said Miller-Meeks. “I applaud DHS and FEMA for working to assist our local fire companies. As a member of the Homeland Security Committee, with jurisdiction over DHS and FEMA, I look forward to continuing to work to support Iowans wherever I can.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for IA 2nd Distridt since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Senator from 2019 – 2021; Director of the Iowa Department of Public Health from 2011 – 2014

Featured Quote: 
No one is more worthy of experiencing open access to the incredible places that the men and women have fought to keep us free and their families who have also made the ultimate sacrifice along with them. #VIPAct

Featured Video: 
Sen. Mariannette Miller-Meeks

About

Mariannette Miller-Meeks 1

Source: Government page

Mariannette’s father was a Master Sergeant in the United States Air Force who was forced to take up extra work, sometimes two or three jobs, to support their family. Her mother, who did not have a high school education, also worked multiple jobs.

Mariannette originally dreamed of becoming a teacher because she loved school and wanted to share her passion for learning with others. However, in 10th grade, she was severely burned in a kitchen fire. While at the hospital, Mariannette was treated by a physical therapist who went out of her way to make sure she got better. This woman’s kindness and selflessness inspired her to become a doctor so she could help others.

Mariannette was the fourth of eight children and since her parents did not have the means to pay for college, she left home at 16 and enrolled in community college. She later enlisted in the United States Army at 18, where she served for 24 years as a private, nurse, and doctor (ophthalmologist or eye diseases/surgery.) She went into private practice in Ottumwa in 1997 and she has remained there with her husband, Curt.

Mariannette has two grown children, Jonathon and Taylor. In 2010, Governor Terry Branstad appointed her as the Director of the Iowa Department of Public Health where she served until 2014.

In 2018, the voters of Senate District 41 elected Mariannette to fight for them in the Iowa State Senate. She resigned from the state senate on January 2, 2021 to take her seat in the United States House of Representatives.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

Aluminum Caucus

Army Caucus

Biofuels Caucus

Bus Caucus

Conservative Climate Caucus

For Country Caucus

General Aviation Caucus

GOP Doctors Caucus

GOP Healthy Futures Task Force

Grid Innovation Caucus

Mental Health Caucus

Motorcycle Caucus

Pandemic Preparedness Caucus, Co-Chair

Pro-Life Caucus

Public Schools Caucus, Co-Chair

Rural Broadband Caucus

Small Business Caucus

Sportsmen’s Caucus

Steel Caucus

Suburban Caucus

Taiwan Caucus

Telehealth Caucus

Western Caucus

Women, Peace, and Security Caucus

Offices

1716 Longworth House Office Building

Washington, DC  20515

Phone: (202) 225-6576
105 East Third Street
Rooms 201A & 201B

Ottumwa, IA  52501

Phone: (641) 244-7020
Fax: (641) 244-7020

 

Contact

Email:

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Wikipedia Entry

Mariannette Jane Miller-Meeks (born September 6, 1955) is an American physician and politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Iowa’s 2nd congressional district. The district includes most of Iowa’s southeastern quadrant, including Davenport, Bettendorf, Burlington, Iowa City, and Miller-Meeks’s hometown of Ottumwa.

Miller-Meeks ran three unsuccessful campaigns for the U.S. House against Dave Loebsack. When Loebsack retired in 2020, she ran again and defeated Rita Hart by a margin of just six votes. She also served as Iowa State Senator for the 41st district from 2019 to 2021.

Early life

Miller-Meeks was born in Herlong, California in 1955.[1] She enlisted in the United States Army at the age of 18 and served for 24 years, including as a nurse, physician, and member of the United States Army Reserve. She retired at the rank of lieutenant colonel.

A first-generation college student, Miller-Meeks earned a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree from Texas Christian University, a Master of Science in education from University of Southern California, and a Doctor of Medicine from University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.[2]

Career

Miller-Meeks operated a private ophthalmology practice in Ottumwa, Iowa, until 2008. She also served as the first female president of the Iowa Medical Society. She was the first woman on the faculty of the University of Iowa‘s department of ophthalmology and visual sciences, and worked as a representative from Iowa to the American Academy of Ophthalmology.[2] In 2010, Governor Terry Branstad appointed Miller-Meeks director of the Iowa Department of Public Health; she resigned in 2014 to run for Congress.[3][4]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2008–2014

Miller-Meeks was the Republican nominee for Iowa’s 2nd congressional district in 2008, 2010 and 2014, losing to Dave Loebsack in all three races. When Mark Chelgren announced he was not running for reelection, she ran for Iowa Senate, District 41 in 2018, defeating Democratic nominee Mary Stewart.[5] Her term in the Iowa Senate began January 14, 2019.

In her 2014 campaign, Miller-Meeks opposed the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare).[1] She also stated her opposition to legalized abortion except in cases of rape, incest, or harm to the mother.[1] Of same-sex marriage, she said in 2014 that she favors “traditional marriage.”[1] She criticized EPA regulation of waterways and coal plants, saying it creates uncertainty for farmers.[1]

2020

Miller-Meeks ran to represent Iowa’s 2nd congressional district again in 2020, following Loebsack’s retirement.[6] She won the June 2 Republican primary election, defeating former Illinois Congressman Bobby Schilling.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, she said she “practices social distancing, wears a mask in public and sanitizes her hands” but does not support face mask mandates.[7]

She faced the Democratic nominee, former State Senator Rita Hart, in the November general election.[8] After Loebsack announced his retirement, journalists and election forecasters labeled the 2nd congressional district a swing district. Miller-Meeks defeated Hart in the general election by six votes, making this the closest election in 2020 and flipping Iowa’s 2nd Congressional District from Democratic to Republican control in one of the closest races in 100 years; the state certified the victory.[9][10] Hart contested the certified result through a petition with the Committee on House Administration under the 1969 Federal Contested Elections Act, which sets forth procedures for contesting state election results in the House under the Constitution.[11] Hart did not contest the election in Iowa’s courts.[11][12][13] In her petition, Hart contended that 22 legally cast votes were not counted. Had they been counted, per her petition, she would have won the race by nine votes.[14][15]

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi provisionally seated Miller-Meeks on January 3, 2021, pending adjudication of Hart’s petition.[14][16] The Committee on House Administration reviewed Hart’s petition, and Pelosi claimed the House had the authority to expel Miller-Meeks,[17][18] but on March 31, Hart withdrew her challenge.[19]

Miller-Meeks and Michelle Fischbach of Minnesota are the only Republican members of Congress to flip Democratic House districts that were not held by Republicans before 2018.

Tenure

Miller-Meeks, along with all other Senate and House Republicans, voted against the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.[20]

On May 19, 2021, Miller-Meeks was one of 35 Republicans who joined all Democrats in voting to approve legislation to establish the January 6, 2021 commission meant to investigate the storming of the U.S. Capitol.[21]

Committee assignments[22]

Personal life

Miller-Meeks is a resident of Ottumwa, Iowa. She is married to Curt Meeks, the Compliance Officer at Otumwa Regional Health Center, and has two children.[23][24] She is Roman Catholic.[1] Miller-Meeks organized a physician recruitment and retention organization to help bring physicians to southeast Iowa and has served as a court-appointed special advocate volunteer for children.[2]

Electoral history

2008

2008 Iowa’s 2nd congressional district election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dave Loebsack (incumbent) 175,218 57.19
RepublicanMariannette Miller-Meeks118,77838.77
GreenWendy Barth6,6642.18
IndependentBrian White5,4371.78
No partyOthers2610.09
Total votes306,358 100.00
Turnout 
Democratic hold

2010

2010 Iowa’s 2nd congressional district election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dave Loebsack (incumbent) 115,839 50.99
RepublicanMariannette Miller-Meeks104,31945.92
LibertarianGary Joseph Sicard4,3561.92
ConstitutionJon Tack2,4631.08
No partyOthers1980.09
Total votes227,175 100.00
Turnout 
Democratic hold

2014

2014 Iowa’s 2nd congressional district election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dave Loebsack (incumbent) 143,431 52.48
RepublicanMariannette Miller-Meeks129,45547.36
Write-ins4430.16
Total votes273,329 100
Democratic hold

2018

2018 Iowa’s 41st senate district primary elections[25]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mariannette Miller-Meeks 1,706 85.39
RepublicanDaniel Cesar27913.96
Write-ins130.65
Total votes2,134 100
2018 Iowa’s 41st senate district general election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mariannette Miller-Meeks 11,451 51.77
DemocraticMary Stewart10,63248.07
Write-ins360.16
Total votes22,119 100
Republican hold

2020

Iowa’s 2nd congressional district, 2020
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mariannette Miller-Meeks 196,964 49.912
DemocraticRita Hart196,95849.910
Total votes394,439 100.0
Republican gain from Democratic

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Jackson, Sharyn (October 12, 2014). “Hot issues dominate 2nd District”. Des Moines Register. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c “Mariannette Miller-Meeks”. Archives of Women’s Political Communication. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  3. ^ “Mariannette Miller-Meeks Archives of Women’s Political Communication”. Iowa State University. Retrieved February 26, 2021.
  4. ^ Leys, Tony (January 10, 2014). “Iowa health director quits, weighs third run for Congress”. The Des Moines Register. Retrieved February 26, 2021.
  5. ^ “Miller-Meeks elected state senator; Gaskill, Huit, Parker win their races”. Ottumwa Courier. November 7, 2018. Retrieved November 12, 2018.
  6. ^ “Miller-Meeks kicks off race for Iowa’s 2nd District”. The Gazette. October 1, 2019. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  7. ^ Payne, Marissa. “U.S. House rivals Hart and Miller-Meeks focus on health care, pandemic in second debate”. The Gazette. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  8. ^ Smith, Zachary Oren. “Mariannette Miller-Meeks wins Republican nomination in Iowa’s 2nd District to face Democrat Rita Hart”. Iowa City Press-Citizen. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  9. ^ “2nd District Candidates Spar Over Conservative Credentials In Largest Republican Primary In Years”. Iowa Public Radio. May 28, 2020. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  10. ^ Hartnett, Mary. “Iowa’s 2nd Congressional District Could Swing Right, 5:04”. www.kwit.org. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  11. ^ a b Bridget Bowman & Herb Jackson, Iowa Democrat Rita Hart to appeal 2nd District results to House, Roll Call (December 2, 2020).
  12. ^ Pfannenstiel, Brianne; Zachary Oren Smith. “Iowa certifies Republican Mariannette Miller-Meeks won Iowa’s 2nd Congressional District seat — by 6 votes”. Des Moines Register. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  13. ^ “Iowa Democrat will challenge election results with House”. POLITICO. Retrieved December 14, 2020.
  14. ^ a b Brianne Pfannenstiel and Ian Richardson (January 3, 2021). “Iowa Republican Mariannette Miller-Meeks provisionally seated in 117th Congress as new session begins”. Des Moines Register.
  15. ^ Rogers, Alex; Raju, Manu (March 18, 2021). “House Democrats weigh ejecting GOP winner of contested Iowa race, dismissing comparisons to Trump’s efforts to overturn election”. CNN. Retrieved March 18, 2021.
  16. ^ “Pelosi to seat Republican in contested Iowa race”. POLITICO. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  17. ^ “Pelosi defends possible expulsion of Iowa Republican who won by 6 votes”. New York Post. Retrieved March 26, 2021.
  18. ^ “Pelosi downplays concerns from moderates about reviewing contested Iowa race”. The Hill. Retrieved March 27, 2021.
  19. ^ Schultz, Marisa (March 31, 2021). “Dem Rita Hart backs down in Iowa election challenge to Miller-Meeks amid mounting GOP pressure”. Fox News. Retrieved March 31, 2021.
  20. ^ Carl Hulse (March 6, 2021). “After Stimulus Victory in Senate, Reality Sinks in: Bipartisanship Is Dead”. New York Times.
  21. ^ LeBlanc, Paul (May 19, 2021). “Here are the 35 House Republicans who voted for the January 6 commission”. CNN. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  22. ^ “Miller-Meeks Appointed to House Education and Labor, Homeland Security, Veterans’ Affairs Committees | Representative Mariannette Miller-Meeks”. millermeeks.house.gov. Retrieved February 2, 2021.
  23. ^ “Curt Meeks”. linkedin.com. Curt Meeks. Retrieved 19 June 2021.
  24. ^ “Senator Mariannette Miller-Meeks”. The Iowa Legislature. Retrieved February 5, 2020.
  25. ^ “State of Iowa – Primary Election 2018 – Canvass Summary (6/5/2018)” (PDF). Secretary of State of Iowa. June 6, 2018. p. 149. Retrieved November 12, 2018.

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Iowa Senate
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Randy FeenstraRandy Feenstra

Current Position: US Representative for IA 4th District since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Senator from 2009 – 2021; Treasurer of Sioux County from 2006 – 2008

Featured Quote: 
Iowans #FiredFinkenauer b/c she helped Pelosi pass her radical agenda at every turn – higher taxes & taxpayer funded abortions. We stopped her once and we will do it again. Nobody works harder than @ChuckGrassley. All 99 counties every year, working for Iowa farmers & families.

Featured Video: 
Meet the Lawmaker: Rep. Randy Feenstra, R-Iowa

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Feenstra Announces 2021 Military Academy Selection Board
feenstra.gov.house, Press ReleaseSeptember 2, 2021

HULL, Iowa — Today, Rep. Randy Feenstra (IA-04) announced the eight members who will serve on the 2021 Military Academy Selection Board for the 4th District. Four members will serve on the board for two years, while the other four will serve for one year to create an annual four-person rotation.

“I am pleased to announce the eight members who will serve on our inaugural Military Academy Selection Board,” said Rep. Feenstra. “I appreciate their willingness to volunteer their time, charged with the unique and important task of selecting candidates to recommend for one of four U.S. service academies. This process is an outstanding opportunity for Iowans seeking to serve our country and wanting to receive a quality education. I strongly encourage interested Iowans to apply for a nomination through my office.”

News

i
Feenstra Announces 2021 Military Academy Selection Board
feenstra.gov.house, Press ReleaseSeptember 2, 2021

HULL, Iowa — Today, Rep. Randy Feenstra (IA-04) announced the eight members who will serve on the 2021 Military Academy Selection Board for the 4th District. Four members will serve on the board for two years, while the other four will serve for one year to create an annual four-person rotation.

“I am pleased to announce the eight members who will serve on our inaugural Military Academy Selection Board,” said Rep. Feenstra. “I appreciate their willingness to volunteer their time, charged with the unique and important task of selecting candidates to recommend for one of four U.S. service academies. This process is an outstanding opportunity for Iowans seeking to serve our country and wanting to receive a quality education. I strongly encourage interested Iowans to apply for a nomination through my office.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for IA 4th District since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Senator from 2009 – 2021; Treasurer of Sioux County from 2006 – 2008

Featured Quote: 
Iowans #FiredFinkenauer b/c she helped Pelosi pass her radical agenda at every turn – higher taxes & taxpayer funded abortions. We stopped her once and we will do it again. Nobody works harder than @ChuckGrassley. All 99 counties every year, working for Iowa farmers & families.

Featured Video: 
Meet the Lawmaker: Rep. Randy Feenstra, R-Iowa

About

Randy Feenstra 1

Source: Government page

Randy Feenstra was born and raised in Hull, Iowa, where he has served as City Administrator, Sioux County Treasurer, and Iowa state Senator. Feenstra received a bachelor’s degree from Dordt University and went on to receive his MPA from Iowa State University. After a successful tenure as head of sales for the Foreign Candy Company, he began teaching business and economics classes at Dordt University. He is married to his wife of 28 years, and they have four children.

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1440 Longworth House Office Building

Washington, DC  20515

Phone: (202) 225-4426
Fax: (202) 225-3193
320 6th Street
Room 112

Sioux City, IA  51101

Phone: (712) 224-4692
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Fort Dodge, IA  50501

Phone: (515) 302-7060

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Wikipedia Entry

Randall Lee Feenstra (born January 14, 1969) is an American politician and businessman serving as the U.S. Representative for Iowa’s 4th congressional district. The district covers much of the northwestern quadrant of the state, including Sioux City, but stretches as far east as Ames and Mason City.

A member of the Republican Party, he served as an Iowa State Senator for the 2nd district from 2009 to 2021. Feenstra previously was the Sioux County Treasurer from 2006 to 2008.

He defeated incumbent Steve King in the primary election for the Republican nomination for Iowa’s 4th congressional district in 2020. He defeated Democratic nominee J. D. Scholten in the general election by more than 25 points; he was sworn into Congress on January 3, 2021.

Early life and education

Randy Feenstra was born to parents Lee and Eleanor Feenstra on January 14, 1969.[1][2] He is of Dutch ancestry.[3] Feenstra graduated from Western Christian High School, where he played basketball.[4][5] He received a bachelor’s degree from Dordt University, then called Dordt College, and his MPA from Iowa State University.[6][7]

Career

Feenstra began his career as sales manager for the Foreign Candy Company,[1][8] known for being the first US company to import Warheads, later serving as city administrator of Hull, Iowa for seven years.[9] In 2006, he was elected Sioux County Treasurer, replacing Robert Hagey.[9][10] Randy Jacobsma replaced Feenstra in a 2008 special election,[11][12] as Feenstra won his first term in the Iowa Senate that year.

Feenstra was elected to the Iowa State Senate in 2008 with 24,595 votes, running unopposed.[13] He was reelected in 2012, again without opposition.[14] He ran for a third uncontested term in 2016.[15] In the Iowa Senate, Feenstra served on the Capital Projects, Fiscal, Tax Expenditure, Transportation, Ways and Means, and State Government Committee.[16]

While serving in the Iowa Senate, Feenstra worked for ISB Insurance in Hull, operated by Iowa State Bank. In 2017, he joined the faculty of Dordt University, after having taught there in an adjunct capacity since 2011.[17][18]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2020

In 2019, Feenstra announced he would challenge incumbent Republican U.S. Representative Steve King in the 2020 Republican primary in Iowa’s 4th congressional district. His state senate district includes much of the northwestern portion of the congressional district.[19] King, a nine-term incumbent, has a record of making inflammatory remarks, including support of the term “white nationalist.”[20] He had been stripped of his committee seats for questioning why “white nationalist” was offensive. Feenstra noted this in announcing his campaign, saying that King’s “caustic nature” had left the 4th “without a seat at the table.”[21]

Republican Party leadership supported Feenstra in the primary.[22][23][24][25] During the course of the primary, Feenstra raised more money in contributions than King, and was supported by the United States Chamber of Commerce and National Right to Life Committee.[26] Feenstra’s candidacy was also supported by conservative political commentator and radio host Ben Shapiro, who donated and urged his Twitter followers to donate to Feenstra’s campaign.[27]

Feenstra defeated King in the June 2 Republican primary.[28][29] Feenstra received 45.7% of the vote, whereas King received 36%.[30][31] Much of Feenstra’s margin came from dominating his state senate district, which he carried with almost 75% of the vote.[19] He went on to defeat J. D. Scholten in the general election by a large margin.

2020 Republican primary election for Iowa’s 4th Congressional District[32]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Randy Feenstra 37,329 45.5
RepublicanSteve King (incumbent)29,36635.9
RepublicanJeremy Taylor6,4187.8
RepublicanBret Richards6,1407.5
RepublicanSteve Reeder2,5283.1
Write-in1760.2
Total votes81,957 100.0
2020 election for U.S. Representative of Iowa’s 4th Congressional District
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Randy Feenstra 237,369 62.0
DemocraticJ. D. Scholten144,76137.8
Write-in8920.2

Tenure

Iraq

In June 2021, Feenstra was one of forty-nine House Republicans who voted in favor of the repeal of the AUMF against Iraq.[33][34]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Personal life

Feenstra married his wife Lynette in 1996. The couple has four children.[37][38]

References

  1. ^ a b Mahoney, Mark (January 12, 2019). “Hull state senator to run for Congress”. N’West Iowa Review. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  2. ^ Visser, Jeanne. “Feenstra will run for State Senate”. Sioux County Index–Reporter. Archived from the original on March 2, 2016. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  3. ^ Kampeas, Ron (May 20, 2020). “Jewish Republicans tackle a thorny question: What to do about Republicans like Steve King?”. Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Retrieved June 6, 2020. Alternative URL
  4. ^ Geleynse, Jesse (April 24, 2011). “Iowa legislature needs to continue eligibility debate”. Le Mars Daily Sentinel. Retrieved January 14, 2014.
  5. ^ Kilen, Mike (March 15, 2016). “The Iowa town where basketball is king”. Des Moines Register. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  6. ^ “Feenstra touts conservative record in Legislature”. The Messenger. May 16, 2020. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  7. ^ Kealey, Katherine (June 3, 2020). “Randy Feenstra beats Steve King in the Republican 4th District primaries”. Iowa State Daily. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  8. ^ Kealey, Katherine (May 24, 2020). “Congressional Republican candidates speak on constitutional rights, abortion and COVID-19”. Iowa State Daily. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  9. ^ a b “Hull city administrator now county treasurer”, Sioux Falls Argus Leader, September 3, 2006, page 12.
  10. ^ “Feenstra announces bid for Senate seat”. Le Mars Daily Sentinel. March 4, 2008. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  11. ^ “MINUTES OF SIOUX COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORSMEETING HELD ON NOVEMBER 12, 2008” (PDF). Sioux County Board of Supervisers. November 2008. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  12. ^ “Primary: Voters will select who faces Culver”. Sioux County Index Reporter. June 2, 2010. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  13. ^ “Democrats keep Senate, House”. Des Moines Register. Newspapers.com. November 5, 2008. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  14. ^ “2012 General Precinct Vote Totals by County”. Iowa Secretary of State. Retrieved November 15, 2014.
  15. ^ Hoogland, Steve (November 8, 2016). “Wheeler wins Iowa House seat”. N’West Iowa Review. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  16. ^ Senator Randy Feenstra“. The Iowa Legislature. Retrieved November 15, 2014.
  17. ^ Lawrence, Tom (August 1, 2017). “Feenstra to become Dordt professor”. Sioux Center News. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  18. ^ “Feenstra leaving insurance business for college position”. Sioux County Index Reporter. August 2, 2017. Retrieved August 9, 2017.
  19. ^ a b J. Miles Coleman (July 30, 2020). “House Primaries: A Little More Action This Year Than Usual”. UVA Center For Politics. Retrieved August 4, 2020.
  20. ^ Gabriel, Trip (January 15, 2019). “A Timeline of Steve King’s Racist Remarks and Divisive Actions”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 2, 2020.
  21. ^ Cillizza, Chris (January 11, 2019). “How in the world is Steve King still in Congress?”. CNN. Retrieved August 4, 2020.
  22. ^ Easley, Jonathan (May 17, 2020). “GOP rallies behind effort to defeat Steve King”. The Hill. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  23. ^ “Republican U.S. Rep. Steve King gets a GOP challenger, Iowa Sen. Randy Feenstra”. Des Moines Register. Retrieved February 18, 2019.
  24. ^ Cillizza, Chris (January 11, 2019). “How in the world is Steve King still in Congress?”. CNN. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  25. ^ Hayworth, Brett (April 16, 2020). “Scholten, Feenstra continue to dwarf King in Iowa 4th District congressional fundraising”. Sioux City Journal. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  26. ^ Gabriel, Trip (May 27, 2020). “Despite Racist Remarks, Steve King Might Win Tuesday’s Iowa Primary”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 2, 2020.
  27. ^ Fisher, Alyssa. “Ben Shapiro Condemns Steve King For Asking Why ‘White Supremacist’ Is Offensive”. The Forward. Retrieved June 2, 2020.
  28. ^ Zhou, Li (June 2, 2020). “Embattled Rep. Steve King has lost his primary”. Vox. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  29. ^ Gruber-Miller, Stephen (June 2, 2020). “Steve King loses Republican primary race to Randy Feenstra, ending King’s decades long political career”. Des Moines Register. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  30. ^ Mutnik, Ally; Arkin, James; Montellaro, Zach (June 2, 2020). “Steve King ousted on historic primary night”. Politico.
  31. ^ Forgey, Quint (June 3, 2020). “Trump congratulates Randy Feenstra for unseating Rep. King”. Politico. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  32. ^ Cite error: The named reference IAsosr was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  33. ^ “House votes to repeal 2002 Iraq War authorization”.
  34. ^ https://clerk.house.gov/evs/2021/roll172.xml
  35. ^ “MEMBERS”. RMSP. Retrieved March 1, 2021.
  36. ^ “Membership”. Republican Study Committee. December 6, 2017. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  37. ^ “Feenstra launches re-election bid”. Chronicle Times. January 6, 2012. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  38. ^ “Iowa Senator Feenstra files for re-election”. Chronicle Times. March 7, 2012. Retrieved January 12, 2019.

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Iowa Senate
Preceded by
Dave Mulder
Member of the Iowa Senate
from the 2nd district

2009–2021
Succeeded by
Jeff Taylor
Elect
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Steve King
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Iowa’s 4th congressional district

2021–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Pat Fallon
United States representatives by seniority
385th
Succeeded by
Michelle Fischbach


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